Firing Your Doctor: Is It Time? (And How to Deal With the Confrontation)

How to deal with confrontation when you want to change doctors.

Many of us don’t know how to deal with confrontation, especially when it involves authority figures. Because of this, it can be difficult to change doctors, even when you know in your gut it is the right thing to do.

How do you know if it’s time to switch? A lot of doctors are facing financial pressures these days. They’re so concerned with how many patients they can see per hour that they begin to view patients as numbers rather than people.

If you believe your issues are not being taken seriously, or that you are rushed through appointments when you need time to explain your health issues, it could be time to get another opinion and possibly change providers. A personal support counselor can help guide you through the process.

Do You Know How to Deal with Confrontation?

If you don’t know how to deal with confrontation, or don’t like it, know that it’s natural to avoid it. But if you unquestioningly obey professionals like doctors, there’s a chance you may not be getting the respect or the health care you deserve.

Here are a few signs that it may be time to switch providers.

1. If Seeking a Second Opinion is a No-No

You have the right to seek a second opinion, especially on serious health matters. If your doctor reacts negatively to the idea, she may not be the right health care professional for you. Openness and a good rapport are important to the doctor-patient relationship.

2. “Trust Me, I’m a Doctor”

How does your doctor react when you tell him what you’ve learned through your own research about a disease or health concern? Does he embrace your interest or does he seem threatened or insulted?

You are an authority on your own body. Doctors who treat their relationship with you as a partnership rather than ruler and subject are better healers because the lines of communication are open.

3. No Personal Connection

Some doctors are more interested in health or lab results than the patient sitting right in front of them. Discussing issues is part of the process, there is no shame in switching doctors if you feel the one you have been seeing is in too big a hurry or fails to treat you as a whole person.

You Deserve Quality Healthcare

Openness and mutual respect are what we all want in a health care professional. If you feel that’s lacking in your doctor-patient relationship, start by learning how to deal with confrontation. Prepare what you want to say. Then share your feelings with your doctor and ask for the kind of interaction you want. If that doesn’t work, you have the right to change doctors. After all, it’s your health and your life.

Your Turn to Vent: Have you ever wanted to switch doctors but found it hard? Why? And how did you deal with the confrontation, or did you just avoid it? Share your story with us.

Kendall Van Blarcom is a senior helping seniors. Contact Van Blarcom Consulting today for help with your personal problems. Or, reach out to provide support for an older adult in your life.

One Comment

  1. This really hits home for me. I live in a small community where doctors come and go regularly, so it’s hard to find and keep a good one. I had a bad experience with a new doctor who couldn’t even make eye contact with me and he made a bad mistake on a diagnosis and prescribed the absolute wrong treatment. Luckily, I found a great MD 40 minutes away by car. She’s so worth travelling for! When she walks into the examining room, the first thing she does is looks into my face and asks how I am with genuine interest. Great MDs like her are few and far between, but I’m so glad I searched and found one.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Share This Post
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on mix
Share on reddit
Share on email

Now accepting Guest Blog Submissions here.